Research

50 views

Controversial Topics And Freedom of Speech on Campus

This study set out to investigate four questions: 1.) Do students want more discussion of controversial topics on campus? 2.) What kind of topics are students most interested in discussing? 3.) Do students feel they can speak their mind? If not, why?
of 1
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Share
Transcript
  Controversial Topics And Freedom of Speech on Campus Bernier, J., Comtois, S., DeLuca, E., Dodd, K., Harder, J., Hawes, K., Judge, A., Levasseur, J., MacLeod, S., Nadeau, M., Summers, A., Tirrell, E., Yeaton, S., Zubricki, A. This study set out to investigate four questions: 1.) Do students want more discussion of controversial topics on campus?2.) What kind of topics are students most interested in discussing?3.) Do students feel they can speak their mind? If not, why?4.) Where do students feel most and least uncomfortable speaking their mind?   Research QuestionsResults & Discussion Students at a small NE liberal arts college were solicited by email to complete an online survey. Data was tabulated in SPSS, word-frequency in Adobe Illustrator. Methodology 60% of total respondents showed interest in having more discussion of controversial issues on campus. Three statistically significant correlations (p < 0.05) stood out during data analysis. “ Do you feel you can speak your mind in class?”  While all political spectra expressed interest in more frequent dialogue about controversial topics, Democrats were the most enthusiastic.People who identify as gay, lesbian, or bisexual were found to be especially interested in dialogue about controversial topics. “Should there be more conversations regarding controversial topics on campus?” 53.37%No46.63%Yes “Are you comfortable talking about controversial topics in class?”  The most commonly cited reasons students felt uncomfortable speaking out in class were:  just not wanting to (60.11%),  peer influence (55.06%), and  professor bias (23.60%), 32.02%No67.98%Yes    S   e   x   u   a    l   O   r   i   e   n   t   a   t   i   o   n   P   o    l   i   t   i   c   a    l   P   a   r   t   y • 56 Republican (31.46%) • 57 Democrat (32.02%) • 62 Independent (34.83%) • 2 Green Party (1.69%) Word Cloud -100 Most Frequent Topics Saint Joseph’s College Honors Program • 162 straight (91.01%) • 2 gay (1.12%) • 4 lesbian (2.25%) • 10 bisexual (5.62%) There were 178 participants in this study.There seems to be a discontinuity between students wanting to have more discussion about controversial topics, and their willingness to pursue this dialogue in class. The high percentage of people who said they “  just don’t want to ” speak of their opinions in class may indicate students would appreciate discussions on campus, but in an extra-curricular setting independent of coursework. Looking ahead, Saint Joseph’s College should strive to cultivate an intellectual climate of open and critical dialogue, both in and outside the classroom. Conclusion and Recommendations
Advertisement
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks